World Cup Injuries – Luis Suarez’s Rehab

Courtesy of The Guardian
Courtesy of The Guardian

After the recent hype around Luis Suarez’s injury and the likelihood of him returning to crunch match tomorrow evening. I’ve re-blogged this post by Amy Buckley from AposTherapy about Luis rehab undertaken to get him back in the game. Enjoy:

 

Millions of football fans worldwide are following closely after Luis Suarez recovery from his recent knee injury. His absence from the game with Costa Rica had a great impact on Uruguay team performance, and now the speculations are if he’s going to play the game vs. England.

Our specialists at AposTherapy decided to provide some professional insights on Suarez injury, treatment and a recovery process.

Suarez suffered from meniscus tear, a knee joint injury, common among football players, when the knee is twisted whilst in a partially flexed position and the foot is firmly planted on the ground.

The medial and lateral menisci of the knee are two crescent-moon-shaped disks of tissue (fibrocartilage) that lie between the ends of the upper leg bone (femur) and the lower leg bone (tibia) that form the knee joint. The menisci act as shock absorbers, evenly distributing the load across the knee and helping to keep the joint stable.

Symptoms of a meniscus tear depend on the size and location of the tear and whether other injuries to the knee occurred with it. A significant problem with meniscus tears manifests itself through ‘locking’ of the knee.  Luis reportedly suffered a lateral meniscus tear, a condition that may be pointed by a significant pain at the outer side of the affected knee.

Treatment options include: Nonsurgical treatment with rest, ice, compression, elevation, and exercises. Surgical repair to sew the tear together. Surgical removal of the torn section (partial meniscectomy). Neuremuscular control treatment. Total meniscectomy, which removes the entire meniscus, is typically avoided because of the increased risk for osteoarthritis (wear and tear).

Luis Suarez, for instance, underwent an arthroscopic. After his surgery, Luis was seen leaving the hospital immobilised with a brace.

Recovery from a meniscus tear depends on many things. The goals of rehabilitation are to restore range of motion, strength, and return the player back to a sporting condition.

Initial stages of rehabilitation will focus on restoring normal range of motion, normalising gait, eliminating swelling, and pain control to enable rehabilitation.

At the second stage of rehabilitation, the player works on good control of the knee through non-impact proprioceptive drills, hip and core strengthening, and quadriceps strengthening.

The final stage of rehabilitation concentrates on returning the player back to the sporting arena through completing sports specific movements and gradually re-introducing impact based activities.

At present, Luis is 3 weeks after his surgery, and through the help of his medical team, he will be working on impact control exercises, increasing the load and demand through a range of plyometric exercises. In addition, he will be working on sports specific balance and proprioceptive drills, hip and core strengthening, and return to light training in preparation for his appearance against England on Thursday.

 

By Amy Buckley posted Jun 17, 2014, AposTherapy Blog

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TA Physio

am driven and passionate about healthcare focused on delivering successful patient outcomes through personalised rehabilitation. So far, I have established a successful career in physiotherapy rehabilitation and gained valuable experience in contributing to marketing strategies within multi-national companies. In 2005 I graduated from UWIC with a degree in science, health, exercise and sport, and then specialised in Physiotherapy and graduated Coventry University in 2008. Since commencing my physiotherapy career I have gained valuable experience in musculoskeletal, sports rehabilitation, and community based neurological and falls prevention rehabilitation within the NHS. In 2010 I set up TA Physio to provide a personal and flexible service for clientele requiring sports rehabilitation, falls prevention & rehabilitation, musculoskeletal physiotherapy as well as bio mechanical assessment in North London. In 2011 I joined AposTherapy as a junior therapist and developed over 2 years to become a Senior AposTherapist in 2013. Recently I have been promoted to lead the London Clinic development and growth reporting directly to the UK Clinical Lead and overseeing ten members of clinical staff. The responsibilities included developing vital HCP links to build referral pathways, accountable for staff development and clinical needs of the AposTherapy London Clinic. In 2014 I provided physiotherapy to elite athletes at The Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games. I was based within the busy and dynamic polyclinic within the Athletes' Villages. The aim is to help Glasgow 2014 deliver a direct access physiotherapy service to the people at the heart of the Games. Specialties: Gait Analysis, Deviations and Gait Rehabilitation; Sports Specific Rehabilitation; Orthopaedic Post Operative Rehabilitation; Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy; Clinical Blog Writing; Development and Growth of Clinical Services; Presenting to Healthcare Professionals & Advisory Boards.