Sensorimotor System – What does it mean & What’s the implication for rehab? Bec van De Scheur

IMG_2527After hitting heavy traffic, turning what should have been a swift two hour car trip into an eventful six hour journey to Birmingham, we finally reached the Therapy Expo 2017!

 

Fuelled with coffee, we sat in on a number of interesting presentations. Although there was diversity amongst the guest speakers a common theme seemed to present itself, the role of the sensorimotor system in injury rehabilitation.

 

Steven Hawking said it perfectly when he stated:

 

“Intelligence is the ability to adapt to change”

 

The human body is of no exception. Our desire to move after injury sees that we will go to great lengths to keep our bodies mobile. Often completely subconscious, we find ways to move around pain, stiffness, or imbalances. Thus, compensatory movement patterns or “muscle patterns” are born.

 

Jo Gibson [Twitter: @shouldergeek1], well renowned shoulder rehabilitation specialist, whose lecture we were lucky enough to attend at the Expo, has been quoted to explain it like this in relation to the shoulder:Jo Gibson januar 2016 (2)_edited1

 

“Muscle Patterning refers to inappropriate recruitment, commonly of the torque producing muscles of the glenohumeral joint e.g. Latissimus Dorsi, Pectoralis Major, Anterior /Posterior Deltoid. This unbalanced muscle action is involuntary and ingrained. Patients with muscle patterning essentially have a muscle recruitment sequencing problem that results in abnormal force couples, destabilising the joint.”

It is an important topic, as failure to correctly diagnose a structural instability versus a functional instability is a common factor in patients failing conventional rehabilitation or surgery.

‘Rehabilitation in this situation should be aimed at ‘normalising’ muscle recruitment patterns around the shoulder girdle and this involves appropriate facilitation throughout the kinetic chain. Balance, coordination and core control are all factors that must be addressed to optimise neuromuscular control mechanisms.’(1)

 

Our ability to adapt to change is both the human body’s greatest strength and its biggest weakness.

As a short term strategy compensation is a great tool. It is protective against further injury and it enables us to get on with our daily function. However, when these newfound motor patterns become long term and supersede our normal programming we will at some stage hit a point of failure, which usually manifests as injury or failed rehab.

 

It can be explained like this…..

 

Your weekend football team is down a player and you have no choice but to replace your star striker with the goalkeeper. Chances are he will manage to get the job done for a period of time, but because his training has not been specific to the role of striker and he is not conditioned or well rehearsed to the demands of this position, at some point in the game he will fatigue, his reaction time will diminish and his ability to generate power and keep up with the pace of the game will become apparent, leaving him vulnerable to injury.

 

Similarly, if you delegate a task to a muscle that it is not designed for, it can deal for a time, but ultimately it will not be able to withstand the extra demands that have been placed upon it.

 

For therapists this is very important to recognise as it will guide how we structure our rehabilitation. When patterns become maladaptive and cemented centrally, rehabilitation takes on a different level of complexity. We are no longer treating an isolated system.

 

It is easier to learn than to unlearn a skill. My father always says, “Practice does not make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect”. As performing something in a sub optimal way over and over again only leads you further away from skill mastery.

 

So lets break it down….

 

What does sensorimotor mean?

 

The term sensorimotor system describes, ‘the sensory, motor, and central integration and processing components involved in maintaining functional joint stability’. This encompasses neuromuscular control and proprioception. (2)

 

Sensorimotor Diagram
Neural Basis of sensorimotor learning: modifying internal [Lalazar & Vaadia, 2008] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959438808001578

Lets look at this in relation to a common injury such as an inversion injury of the ankle….

 

It is generally known that the primary risk factor for an ankle sprain remains a history of a previous sprain (5). It is thought that the initial damage to the lateral ankle ligaments alters the function of mechanoreceptors of these ligaments disrupting the ability to sense motion at the joint (4) and can lead to functional instability of the ankle. It is often described as frequent episodes of “giving way” or feelings of instability at the ankle joint.

 

A number of authors support the idea that some patients with functional ankle instability have deficits in neuromuscular preparatory or anticipatory control, which increases the risk of injury to the ankle, as it is less protected in an inadequate ankle joint position. Add to this a sub optimal rehabilitation program and paving the way towards a chronic ankle issue.

 

So what does this mean in terms of exercise prescription?

 

Benoy Mathew [Twitter: @function2fitnes] from Harley Street Physiotherapy during his talk regarding “the problem ankle” discussed the benefits of dynamic exercises such as sport specific plyometrics, which utilises sensorimotor training to promote anticipatory postural adjustments as well as optimise agility, landing technique and reaction time.

 

When it comes to overall running efficiency Mike Antoniades [Twitter: @runningschool], Performance & Rehabilitation Director of The Running School agrees:

 

“To change running technique, theoretical information and tips will not do the trick. The body needs to learn movement through movement – mostly while running but also through other re-patterning exercises”

(1)

 

During his workshop at the Therapy Expo, Mike gave us great examples during a live running assessment of particular movement dysfunctions that result from motor patterning, which often lead to muscle imbalances, poor technique and may be a factor in the recurrence of injury.

 

A common example is poor gluteal activation, which leads to compensatory hamstring dominance. Recognising this as the main offender of a patients running pain is a great start but strength training alone will only get you so far if it is a neuromuscular issue and ‘sensory motor amnesia’ is the primary reason why certain muscles fail to activate during movement.

 

There is a lot to think about during clinical diagnosis to ensure we are not ‘band-aiding’ a sensorimotor issue with strength exercises and manual therapy.

 

It is our responsibility as physiotherapists to ensure that we are continuously looking for opportunities to enhance our clinical skills. By optimising our assessments we are giving each person that seeks our advice the best opportunity to reach their full potential.

 

  1. Antoniades, M (2016), Mikes view on therapy expo 2016. Retrieved December 10, 2017, from http://runningschool.co.uk/blogs/mikes-view-on-therapy-expo-2016/
  2. Foundation of Sports Medicine Education and Research (1997). The role of proprioception and neuromuscular control in the management of knee and shoulder conditions.; August 22–24; Pittsburgh, PA.
  3. Gibson, J (n.d), Advances in rehabilitation of the shoulder. Retrieved December 10 2017, from http://www.physioroom.com/experts/expertupdate/interview_gibson_20041031_1.php
  4. Hertel J. (2002). Functional anatomy, pathomechanics, and pathophysiology of lateral ankle instability. Journal of Athletic Training. 37(4) 364–75.
  5. Milgrom C, et al. (1991). Risk factors for lateral ankle sprain: a pro- 
spective study among military recruits. Foot Ankle. 12(1), 
26–30.
  6. Lalazar & Vaadia, (2008). Neural Basis of sensorimotor learning: modifying internal models.  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0959438808001578

 

Bec van De Scheurcropped-logo-resize-21.png

Part 2: Beginners Outdoor Training

Hello, welcome back, so how did you get on with your first taste of outdoor training?

Courtesy of Nike Women Outdoors
Courtesy of Nike Women Outdoors

The time has come to move things along and challenge the system a little more. So I’m going to outline the next level with a new set of exercises. Each one will be slightly more advanced than the previous set but similar movement patterns.
As usual begin with your pulse raiser, run, cycle, light jog. Remember it’s only a pulse raiser so nice and easy. Once you’ve picked your spot begin your dynamic stretches. This session will follow a similar course as the previous one so you can stick with the same warm-up.

So to recap:

Dynamic warm-up: Heal kicks to bum, high knee run, high kicks (opposite leg to opposite hand), walking lunges, hamstring stretch, light squats. Finish off with arm swings (windmill motion) and hip rotation. A dynamic warm-up can be what ever you want, as long as it replicates your session.

Session: 20/25 minutes

We’ll do five exercises and three sets. As before if you feel you can tackle 4 then go for it but maybe for the first few sessions start with 3 and build from there. Mark out a 20 metre area for your jog/run as before (which will follow each exercise). You maybe already at the level where you can increase the distance or better still be able to sprint there and back.

1. Split squat x 10 reps per leg (20 metre run there and back)

Split Squat
Split Squat

Stand with one foot in front of the other, split stance, feet pointing forward. Torso nice and upright. Bend at the knees and pulse down until your back knee almost touches the floor. Your front knee should be nicely inline with your front foot. After 10 reps swap legs

2. Reverse lunge x 10 per leg (Run)

Reverse Lunge
Reverse Lunge

Much the same as a forward lunge only in reverse. Take a big step back bending both knees until they are at 90 degrees. Drive back through the heel and push forward. Then repeat on the opposite leg

3. Spider-man press up x 10 (Run)

Spider Man Press Up
Spider Man Press Up

Begin this exercise much in the same way as the traditional press-up. Arms directly under the shoulders, lower until elbows are pointing behind you. As you lower to the ground bend one knee to bring it up to your elbow. As you press back up your leg returns to start position. Repeat with opposite leg. Do five leg raises on each side

4. Single leg squat thrust x 20 (Run)

Single Leg Squat Thrust
Single Leg Squat Thrust

Start in the usual press-up position, body straight. Bring one knee forward under your chest. Jump one leg forward and one leg back at the same time. Alternate as quickly as you can

5. Reverse Bear crawl (begin at start point and crawl 20 metres, then run back)

Reverse Bear Crawl
Reverse Bear Crawl

Get down on all fours. Place one hand and opposite foot backwards and walk. Changing sides as you go. This is a little bit harder than walking forward and should really test your endurance. Once you finish, if you can, crawl (forward) back!

On completion of your first set rest for the usual 90 secs then go again. Hopefully with a few weeks under your belt you should be able to slowly cut down your recovery time. Once you’ve completed your 3 sets go for a light warm-down jog around the park for about 5 mins. Follow this with your usual static stretch, remembering to focus on all the big muscle groups, quads, hamstrings, calves, glutes, groin and hip flexors. Finishing with some arm stretches.
Like before I’ve set a fairly low rep rate to begin with. As you get used to the new set of exercises you’ll soon be adding extra reps and sets onto your routine. As a bit of variation mix up your session by adding in the odd exercise from our previous list. It keeps your body guessing and avoids getting too used to the same movement patterns. It’s also more fun. Look to do this set at least twice a week but three times will really get you moving and closer to your fitness goals.

Remember these exercises are all about quality and not quantity. Always focus on your form and posture.

Good luck and look forward to our next set of exercises as we progress forward.

Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist. Chris Watson
Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist. Chris Watson

**Please note this programme is designed if you already have a basic level of fitness. Any medical problems or injuries please seek professional advice before attempting this session**

Part 1: Beginners Outdoor Training

Now you’ve made the decision to head outdoors to train, it’s time to get some structure into your session. As a regular gym goer you’ll probably have your own routine and level you feel comfortable with, certainly an idea of what stage you’re at in terms of what you deem hard or easy. So lets pretend that this is a whole new experience and start at the beginning.

As a new client I would assess your fitness level and always start fairly easy and go up through the gears as your potential unfolds. The harder you work the faster you’ll progress. Progression can be achieved with every session, no matter how small.

Shall we begin?

We’ve started with our pulse raiser, as mentioned in my previous article Outdoor Training, this can be a run or a cycle. I would recommend about 10 mins at a nice steady pace, nothing too energy sapping as there’s plenty time for that. This is followed by a dynamic warm-up. Usually base this around what you intend to do during your session. For example, if you are planning a forward lunge set, incorporate some walking lunges into your warm-up. This ensures your legs are ready for this movement. Always keep your warm up stretches dynamic at the start. Static stretches come at the end.

Week 1: Beginner session (1 hour)
10 mins pulse raiser – Run/cycle at a light steady pace

5-8mins dynamic stretch: mark a distance, either, with cones or between two trees about 10m apart. A good range for this session would be: Heal kicks to bum, high knee run, walking lunges, high kicks (touching opposite leg with opposite hand), light squats and a two step hamstring stretch (walk two paces, bend from the hip, keeping your legs straight and sweep your hands across the ground). Follow this with some hip rotation, arm swings (in a windmill motion) and a chest stretch.

Session: 20/25 mins
We’re going to start with five exercises and do 3 sets at varying rep rates (depending on the move). After each exercise mark a distance of around 20 metres and jog there and back to your start point. As you get stronger turn your jog into a sprint raising the intensity of your workout.

1. Squat x 12 reps (run 20m and back again)

Squat: Feet shoulder width apart, relaxed stance, back in natural state. In one smooth motion bend your knees, sticking out your bum (as if about to sit on a chair), finishing with your thighs parallel to the floor.
Squat:
Feet shoulder width apart, relaxed stance, back in natural state. In one smooth motion bend your knees, sticking out your bum (as if about to sit on a chair), finishing with your thighs parallel to the floor.

2. Forward Lunge x 12 (alternate legs, 6 per leg. run)

Lunge: Large step forward, with hands on hips. Leading leg parallel to the floor with your knee at 90 degrees and nicely in line with the front of the foot. Drive back up through the heal and repeat on the opposite leg. Make sure your back leg doesn't touch the floor
Lunge:
Large step forward, with hands on hips. Leading leg parallel to the floor with your knee at 90 degrees and nicely in line with the front of the foot. Drive back up through the heal and repeat on the opposite leg. Make sure your back leg doesn’t touch the floor

3. Press-up x 12 (run)

Press-up: Body in a nice straight line, head, shoulder and bum. Arms under your shoulders. Slowly press down keeping your arms nicely tucked in and elbows pointing backwards. Keeping abs braced let the chest lightly brush the floor and push back up.
Press-up:
Body in a nice straight line, head, shoulder and bum. Arms under your shoulders. Slowly press down keeping your arms nicely tucked in and elbows pointing backwards. Keeping abs braced let the chest lightly brush the floor and push back up.

4. Mountain Climber x 12 (run)

Mountain Climber: Begin in an upright press-up position.
Mountain Climber:
Begin in an upright press-up position.
Mountain Climber: Now bring your right knee to your left elbow, with a slight twist of your torso. That's one rep. Repeat on the opposite leg
Mountain Climber:
Now bring your right knee to your left elbow, with a slight twist of your torso. That’s one rep. Repeat on the opposite leg

5. Bear Crawl (begin at start point and crawl about 20m. If you can crawl back. If too hard, one way is fine to begin with. Then run)

Bear Crawl: Drop on all fours.
Bear Crawl:
Drop on all fours.
Bear Crawl: Place one hand and opposite foot forward, walk forward changing sides as you go. The lower you go the harder it gets
Bear Crawl:
Place one hand and opposite foot forward, walk forward changing sides as you go. The lower you go the harder it gets

On completion of your first set rest for about 90 secs and go again. Take longer if needed but try not to exceed 2 mins. The aim is to cut the rest time as you progress. Once you have competed 3 sets and rested for a couple of mins, go for a light warm-down jog for about 5 mins. This is followed by our static stretch. Be sure to stretch of all the relative muscles. Start with the big muscles like the quads, hamstrings and calves. Follow that with hip flexors, groin and glutes. Finishing off with some arm stretches. Always remember to do as it helps with your recovery.

I’ve set a fairly basic rep rate for this session as it’s a good starting point. Complete your first 3 sets and see how you feel. You will be able to tell fairly quickly if you need to add more reps to each exercise or even an extra set. Don’t be scared to push it that little bit each time. Try and fit this in at least twice a week but I’d recommend 3 times.

cw
Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist.
Chris Watson

Give it a go a see how you get on.

Next time we’ll look at ways to progress your session and the benefits of this kind of training.
Chris

**Please note this programme is designed if you already have a basic level of fitness. Any medical problems or injuries please seek professional advice before attempting this session**

7 Minute Work Out

7 Minutes Is All It Takes To Make The Olympics
7 Minutes Is All It Takes To Make The Olympics

I recently read an interesting article titled “7 minutes to get fit” with the catch line “Do twice a week. Job done”. Instantly I was intrigued, fit in two 7min sessions, this ought to be good, or too good to be true. So I began to read.

Studies have found you don’t need to spend hours in the gym to achieve your fitness goals. By following a quick, tight regime you can make a big difference to your overall fitness. The 7 minute work out is a form of high intensity interval training (HIIT) which means extremely intense bursts of activity followed by brief periods of recovery. Research suggests 7 energy sapping minutes broken down into 12 exercises is comparable to a run and weights session combined.

As a strong believer in hard work and time spent in the gym, or park, I was a tad sceptical of a quick fix solution. It sounded a little like a short-cut way of getting fit and I therefore questioned its impact.

So I decided to put the 7 minute workout to the test. I selected a reasonably balanced set of exercises to begin with. Well I’ve got to say it’s a pretty tough 7 minutes. The combination of aerobic and resistance moves gave me a very
balanced and challenging workout. It has been said that HIIT has shown time and again to “deliver numerous health benefits in much less time than traditional programs”. This all sounds very intriguing and exciting but it’s time to let
the public decide.

Having tested it on myself I decided to let my clients decide if it’s a way of training they’d be interested in. I selected a couple of willing participants and designed a program based on the 7 minute workout structure. Carefully mixing
a variation of cardio and resistance movement patterns and timing each exercise at the desired 30 second length (with a 10 second reset between).

My guinea pigs, whom have a fairly good level of fitness, found the session “pretty challenging” but really enjoyed the variation and tempo, finding competing against the clock both fun and exciting. They really felt they’d worked hard and gained a lot from this way of working. As I had a full session to fill we did 3 sets of 12 exercises with a two minute rest between each set. This added another level to the challenge.

Only time will tell if the 7 minute workout will return the fitness goals we’ve set but it was certainly a good start.

See below an example of a structured session containing 12 exercises:

This way of working, I believe, is best done as part of a 3 set, 2-3 times a week routine. Doing two 7 minute workouts per week will undoubtedly improve your fitness levels but I’d suggest doing 2-3 sets twice of three times per week
(if time allows) for maximum potential. So give it a go and see how you get on. I’d be very interested to know your thoughts on this training approach and if you feel it’s working..

A little bit of advice when attempting the 7 minute workout. It’s pretty tough and only recommended if you have a fairly good base fitness due to it’s high intensity nature. If you’ve not exercised in a while then I would suggest a more gentle approach to begin with and build up to the 7 minute workout.

20131026-182636.jpg

Always concentrate on form and doing the exercise correctly and please research any moves you’re not familiar with to avoid any injury or bad habits.

Remember these exercises are all about quality and not quantity. Always focus on your form and posture.

Good luck and look forward to our next set of exercises as we progress forward.

Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist. Chris Watson
Level 3 PT- Outdoor Training Specialist. Chris Watson

**Please note this programme is designed if you already have a basic level of fitness. Any medical problems or injuries please seek professional advice before attempting this session**

Commonwealth Day #10 – Refection #5

Well the end is in sight for Glasgow 2014 Commonwealth Games and I’ve had a blast so much so I might go to Rio.

Working in the poly clinic as a physio to the athletes has been a once in a lifetime experience and taught me so much about the world of elite multi-sport events.

I have had the opportunity to work under a great physiotherapy in Lynne Booth and a fantastic team of physio’s from across the UK.

The next goal for me is to get My Physio in sport bronze award and then continue multi-sport event physiotherapy through UK Athletics and BUCS pathways.

Thanks for reading my previous blogs.

20140803-104137-38497049.jpg

Commonwealth Day #3 – Refelection 3

XX Commonwealth Games
XX Commonwealth Games

Commonwealth Reflection #3;

The Glasgow 2014 commonwealth games are now well and truly underway with Saturday 26th July promising to be a busy schedule of competition across various sports including netball, Judo, and tracking cycling. The athletes are in full swing and the medals are coming thick and fast with this in mind I undertook my third shift at the Games Village Polyclinic.

 

The What?

The poly clinic environment, as I’ve previously mentioned, is a fast paced and exciting environment but requires a cool and collected approach to ensure the athlete gets 1005 the elite care they deserve.  But sometimes the system can be slowed down with bureaucracy  with a classic example of this coming when SEM doctors require ultrasound scans for soft tissue damage. SEM had to refer to radiography for U/S and were unable to perform U/S sans themselves. So SEM referred to radiography but radiography would only do MRI scans due to higher sensitivity rates (1) (2).

 

 

Courtesy of Shoulderdoc.co.uk
Courtesy of Shoulderdoc.co.uk

So What?

The systems clearly works within the polyclinic with this clinic seeing upwards of 400 contacts in a day, but the system can be slowed down. Ideally, the SEM doctor would like to use U/S as part of the assessment process but this may not be time efficient. HCP’s need to carry out a full and thorough assessment of the presenting condition and provide appropriate care, which in this case involved using U/S scans for soft tissue injury. However the radiography preferred MRI scans for diagnostics which cost a lot more money to provide. The resolution came when SEM were finally able to use the diagnostic U/S scans for the athletes. This is by no way a criticism of the current system but goes to show with the best laid systems they need to be flexible to provide a high level of care within a high-octane environment.

 

Now What?

  1. Multi-disciplinary healthcare provision is idealistic and can work with clear and concise communication as well as team work to overcome problems.
  2. Systems and approaches to care provision need to flexible to ensure correct diagnosis and treatment are provided
  3. The athletes are the main priority and excellent care needs to be provided to ensure the best outcome for the athlete

 

Thanks for reading.

 

Tom

 

 

Reference:

1) B Hamilton, R Whiteley, E Almusa, B Roger, C Geertsema1, Johannes L Tol (2013); Excellent reliability for MRI grading and prognostic parameters in acute hamstring injuries; Br J Sports Med.

2) K M Khan, B B Forster, J Robinson, Y Cheong, L Louis, L Maclean, J E Taunton (2003); Are ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging of value in assessment of Achilles tendon disorders? A two year prospective study; Br J Sports Med

 

 

'prehab not rehab'
‘prehab not rehab’

 

Commonwealth Day #2 – Refelection 2

20140709-092114-33674932.jpg
XX Commonwealth Games

Commonwealth Reflection #2:

Hello and welcome back. Thank you for reading my first reflection on my experiences in the Glasgow 2014 commonwealth games. After completing my first poly clinic shift, I was excited to get back in clinic and enjoy shift number two on Wednesday 23rd July, OPENING CEREMONY NIGHT

A little wiser from previous shift, I was feeling more confident in my new surroundings and raring to go one day before competition began.

The What?

So Wednesday turned out to be a quieter shift in the polyclinic due to preparation for the opening ceremony. Naturally, most the attendees were either competing the following day or an acute injury needing attention in preparation for the games.  The team scheduled to cover the evening shift was the same team I worked with the previous day, so I was glad to have some familiar faces in the clinic.

 

So What?

A number of athletes came to the polyclinic seeking intervention for strapping and taping, this is something that is usually undertaken by the national team medical staff but as some nations have differing budgets, not all nations have a full medical team at the games and so they optimised the services at the polyclinic.

Over the course my shift I assessed and treated athletes from sports including Judo, weightlifting, hockey and long jump. these four examples demonstrated a good variety of stage of injury and the appropriate treatment undertaken, difference in teams and the medical support available to prevent such injuries, and expectations from treatment.

– A Judo athlete attended clinic requesting strapping and taping for bilateral posterolateral corner of the knees. No pain upon assessment and so I taped the knees. I think there are many properties to tape and differences between tape and strapping but one underlying factor is the psychological impact it has. I believe that it gives competitors confidence to push their bodies to the highest level despite the absence of injury. In the injured athlete it can be high effective to stabilise a joint (i.e subluxed shoulder).

 

Patellar Femoral Compartment Stress
Patellar Femoral Compartment Stress

– I saw another weightlifter with acute patella tendon tendinopathy and high irritability, why is this a common occurrence? I could only assume it was due to an increased volume of training in preparation for the games. In an ideal world I would love to sit down with the athlete and analyse the training volumes to cross-correlate it to the onset of injury but in a fast paced environment like a polyclinic as well as communication limitations, this is unrealistic. If I were set within a national medical team I would use those skills to monitor injuries within training regimes and highlight these impacts on injury rates thus enabling a team to improve training and performance. These guys would benefit from some eccentric tendinopathy rehabilitation.

– I saw an acute adductor strain (Grade I – MRI confirmed) from one of the larger commonwealth teams and experienced first interaction with national teams doctor requesting treatment. As part of the immediate management, the athlete was put on cryotherapy in the shape of ‘game ready’. This device works by pumping ice cold water into a cuff that is attached to the athlete. The machine setting mean temperature, length of time and compression can be regulated by the clinician. Its a marvellous piece of kit to have especially as it addresses two of the five P.R.I.C.E principles for the immediate management of soft tissue injuries.

Now What?

  1. Its important as a clinician that all patient are thoroughly assessed especially if we have not assessed or don’t know anything about the athlete
  2. Don’t just do what the athlete thinks will help. Clinically reason the problem and take suitable action in the form of treatment
  3. Taking treatment requests from medical teams is acceptable but again question the reasons behind the intervention.

 

Thanks for reading, hope you enjoy the blog, watch this blog for more Commonwealth games posts

 

Tom

Enjoying Games Life
Enjoying Games Life

100m Final

Yet again Usain Bolt confidently brushed aside the worlds best in the Olympic 100m final. Are there any limits to his success? Not only did he run faster then Beijing, he also beat a field including Yohan Blake, Justin Gatlin, Tyson Gay, & Asafa Powell.

Numerically, this is how he did it:

 

 

 

Usain Bolt:

Reaction Time: 0.165sec

Winning Time: 9.63sec

0.06sec faster than Beijing

41 steps for Bolt to complete the race

 

Yohan Blake:

Reaction Time: 0.179sec

Winning Time: sec

46 steps for Bolt to complete the race

The real burning question is, can Bolt hold his title in Rio 2016? or will his powers be deminished? Only time will tell.

 

Pose Running

20120725-083245.jpg
Michael Johnson: ‘Perfectly natural Pose running style’

London 2012 Olympics games are fast appraoching with expectations reaching fever pitch, the whole capital is excited. Modern day sprinting was one of the most over subscribed applications for tickets at the games, with everyone longing to see Usain Bolt in action.

Despite Bolt’s recent rise to sprtitning stardom, we must not forgot the legends of yester year that made the sport what it is today, Michael Johnson, Haile Gabrselassie, Linford Christie, Maurice Green, and Marion Jones to name a few.

Each athlete has their own individual style and technique which leads them to become world beaters but none more memorbale than Michael Johnson’s perfect technique of pose running.

The pose running style was invented by Nicholas Romanov during the 1970’s with the aim to produce easy, effortless and smooth flowing running. Romanov felt his technique would limit undue strain on joints & physical break down with increased training loads whilst collaborating with GB and Russian athletics teams. Romanov proposed one universal technique for all runners, regardless of speed or distance.

Typically, amateur runners naturally use the heel-toe technique but pose running’s distinguishing feature is that the athlete lands on the mid foot.
Naturally, this causes joint to be flexed at impact, with hamstring muscles used to withdraw the foot from the ground. The emphasis is on high cadence not stride length. See the picture below, with the pose running on top & the heel-toe running below:

20120725-083453.jpg
The smoot lines and increased forward posiont of the centre of gravity during Pose running style is well observed in this comparison.

The concept is simple and based on two models by Romanov:
> Mechanically, the centre of gravity, around hip position, should move horizontally without vertical up & down displacement.
> Biologically, the leg remains ‘S-like’ form and never straightens. This arose from animals like a cheetah which never land on heels but pulls through action after mid-foot loading.

20120725-083400.jpg
The cheetah in full flight as its about to make contact with the mid-foot

Despite its simplicity, rigours training and practicing the technique is essential. Having attempted 10 minutes of this style on a treadmill, personally I found it great. But the after affectes were calf-complex DOMS and patello femoral (knee cap) pain for me.

Should athletes change their running style? Only with dedication and patience of carrying out the correct technique alterations through perfect practice. Othewise, it may be those common injuries which comeback and bit you.

Check out my next blog to see drills on ‘how to train for pose running’.

If you think your running technique isn’t up to scratch, TA Physio offer a running assessment and advice service to assist smoother, faster, greater running.

Enjoy the Olympic games 2012 from everyone at TA Physio.